?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Ubuntu is a joke - Arvind Narayanan's journal [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]

Ubuntu is a joke [Mar. 2nd, 2009|07:38 pm]
Arvind Narayanan
[Tags|, , , , , , ]

I installed Ubuntu 8.10 (whatever it's called.. Intrepid?) on my new laptop, and here are some of the things that are seriously wrong just in the first week of using it:
  • I have to type in my password for every little thing. Vista's UAC annoyance doesn't even come close. There is no simple way to stop it from forgetting my password, but fortunately I figured out once and for all how to hand-edit some stupid deliberately undocumented config file in order to do that.
  • I had to spend a few hours to get basic shit like flash working, because the Intel graphics chipset I have is apparently not properly supported. Open source nerds like to scream that hardware vendors don't release specs. Intel is the opposite, they even go so far as to write open source drivers themselves. And it's still not supported? What the fuck?
  • Using a password instead of a key for WPA2 is evidently unsupported. You'd think security is the one thing they'd get right.. no? Read the spec, write the code. What's the problem?
  • There are many, many UI fubars like the fact that the window manager allows you to resize a window so that its titlebar disappears underneath the top-panel, and if you didn't know Alt-drag you wouldn't be able to get it back. Oh, and I can't change the freaking time! Every time I change it it goes right back.
I have absolutely no religious reason to use Ubuntu, Linux or open source. But the fact remains that it's a programmer's dream, apt-get is manna from heaven, and using anything else is like poking yourself in the eye. Yes, including OS X. And I just don't partition my time between programming and other things; that's not how I roll. So I'm forced to use this piece of crap as my main system.

Computers suck.

Edit. Dear anonymous Linux zealots who've been commenting on this post. I have no idea where you're coming from. I'm not a n00b (this is like my three hundredth linux install in ten years of using it as my primary OS). More importantly, I do NOT want your help. And I'm not interested in installing another distro. You are free to keep writing stupid comments but I haven't been approving them and I won't. kthxbai.
LinkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: theswede
2009-03-03 09:58 am (UTC)

Does not compute?

1. What "little things" do you have to type your password for? I have to type it when I start sudo apps, that is applications which will change the system - and I start those maybe twice after a fresh install, and then hardly ever.

2. If you happen to be lucky and have a fairly new Intel chipset, Intel are in the process of completely rewriting the support for it, improving it immensely. The drawback of that is that 8.10 contains a half baked source base. 8.04 will work fine, as will any of the 9.xx, but 8.10 shouldn't be used with Intel chipsets. Mid construction is a bad place, and I find fault with Intel for not providing proper heads up that the so called "stable" code base was anything but.

3. I use a WPA2 password. No idea what problem you're having. Did you try writing the password in the field provided?

4. Gnome is broken. Use KDE. And your clock is being set by teh Internets. Blame them. =)
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: arvindn
2009-03-03 05:43 pm (UTC)

Re: Does not compute?

#1 i use apt-get a lot, and not just on a fresh system. there's also ssh. i use ssh-keygen, which is now apparently locked under the keyring manager or whatever. that's good for security, and i appreciate that, except that i shouldn't have to type in my password once per session.

#2 that's good to hear. thanks.

#3 maybe it wasn't WPA2 then. it's whatever you use to connect through your phone's EVDO connection. the person i was working with does security for a living, so i'll take his word when he said ubuntu doesn't support it yet.

#4 see, the rest of your comment was helpful. why did you have to say that? you know i'm vitriolicall anti-kde.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: theswede
2009-03-03 07:10 pm (UTC)

Re: Does not compute?

1. Why would you run ssh under sudo? I'm lost on that. aptitude (apt-get on steroids) needs sudo yes, but it should remember your password for a bit. If it doesn't, you probably have a clock problem, which could tie in with your 4.

3. No idea what those use. =\

4. I didn't know that, but considering how you don't seem to get along with Gnome, that doesn't leave you with much. Try IceWM? ;)
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: arvindn
2009-03-03 07:20 pm (UTC)

Re: Does not compute?

not ssh under sudo. ssh as regular user with ssh-keygen requires a keyring password. this seems to be new in 8.10.

it remembers the password for 10 minutes. i want it to remember it for the whole session. the solution is to edit the pam config file and set timestamp_timeout=-1. this isn't a problem i'm facing, i figured this out years ago. i'm saying that it should do that out of the box or at least give users an easy way to change it. not everyone can hand-edit config files. (anticipating your possible objection, this isn't gnome's fault, it seems to be ubuntu's policy on security to not expose this to users.)

i LOVE gnome. getting the time automatically from the internet is IMO the right behavior. this removal of prefs (some would say functionality) is what endears me to gnome.

what i needed to change was the timezone. which i also figured out, it's soemwhere in the prefs menu. i was complaining about the fact that changing the timezone should be on the clock and not in the prefs menu.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: theswede
2009-03-04 12:25 pm (UTC)

Re: Does not compute?

Hmm. I don't know what that entails really, you mean dynamic key generation or something? I just use ssh as usual and it works as usual. And I know what pam is, and that it's not Gnome's fault - KDE or what have you do not expose this either - it's just the way Ubuntu rolls, with reasonable defaults for *most* users. Considering you won't find many nublets running ssh with ssh-keygen and getting annoyed at password timeouts, I think it's pretty fair to not expose it, especially since most people who can't find the pam configs won't understand the ramifications of no timeout on sudo and the like.

I believe the time being set is done way below Gnome, but I'm not certain. My system runs KDE and sets the time automatically as well, and uses the system wide TZ setting from /etc. I find that Gnome has removed some things I use a lot, and kept things I find useless, which makes me not so endeared to it; I expect that if it were to match my subset of used functionality better I might like it a lot. KDE allows me to do things without fuss, which is how I've grown to like it in my old age. I have absolutely no issues with people liking one or the other though, I was merely facetious.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From: (Anonymous)
2009-03-03 12:43 pm (UTC)

Ubuntu is a joke

alt-drag........... well I'll be fscked.... thank you, made my kubuntu experience even better........... thank you thank you....
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: rfc9000
2009-03-03 04:23 pm (UTC)
haha
if that makes you feel any better, kubuntu 8.10 is (was) way worse. So bad, it was not the least bit funny. I tested it on just one desktop, and immediately downgraded back to 8.04.

KDE4 was really a joke! I dont understand why people dont realize this simple tenet "if it aint broke, don't fix it!"
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: theswede
2009-03-04 12:27 pm (UTC)
KDE4 is maturing rapidly, and is much faster and "feature correct" than KDE3 in my experience. Not quite there yet, but when KDE4 works it certainly shows what was broken in KDE3, even though it wasn't obvious until a better system existed.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From: thaths
2009-03-05 12:50 am (UTC)
I have to type in my password for every little thing. Vista's UAC annoyance doesn't even come close. There is no simple way to stop it from forgetting my password, but fortunately I figured out once and for all how to hand-edit some stupid deliberately undocumented config file in order to do that.

What are some of the things you are trying to do? In my experience, Ubuntu does a decent job of only asking you for your password when you are about to do something as root (through sudo). And sudo remembers your credentials for some minutes.

I had to spend a few hours to get basic shit like flash working, because the Intel graphics chipset I have is apparently not properly supported. Open source nerds like to scream that hardware vendors don't release specs. Intel is the opposite, they even go so far as to write open source drivers themselves. And it's still not supported? What the fuck?

Not having working flash is not connected to Intel graphics card. Lacking flash support "out of the box" is because of license restrictions from Adobe (they don't let Ubuntu ship the flash player). Intel graphical chipset support, I agree with you.

(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: arvindn
2009-03-05 01:01 am (UTC)
"What are some of the things you are trying to do? In my experience, Ubuntu does a decent job of only asking you for your password when you are about to do something as root (through sudo). And sudo remembers your credentials for some minutes."

i already answered this in detail in another comment.

"Not having working flash is not connected to Intel graphics card. Lacking flash support "out of the box" is because of license restrictions from Adobe (they don't let Ubuntu ship the flash player)."

it bugs me when people respond with the assumption that i'm an idiot/noob. that's why i put a big ass paragraph at the bottom saying i know what i'm talking about. that doesn't seem to have made a difference. of course i know that flash doesn't ship out of the box, and its the first thing i installed. that's not the problem. because of the lack of video driver support, the codec was making the cpu load absurdly high, and the frame rate way too low. uninstalling xserver-xorg-video-intel and installing xserver-xorg-video-vesa fixed the problem, but it's still too slow to watch flash fullscreen.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)